Pitch Perfect

So my first agent pitches areĀ over. And although it didn’t result in a page request, I got some honest feedback, which is what I really needed. That’s a good thing, in my opinion–because I need the truth to improve my work.

It didn’t feel awesomely wonderful, but then again, it wasn’t meant to. Critiques are critical, designed to point out what’s not working. Warm fuzzies are not going to help, right?

Good news? I can solve the problem! Not an easy fix, but a fix nonetheless. As the old saying goes, “Kill your darlings.” Well, I’m getting the cleaver out and trimming the fat from my manuscript.

The long and short of it is, a fresh pair of eyes is a good thing. We writers tend to fall in love with our creations, not necessarily a bad thing, but it’s less than helpful when we need to tighten our prose, streamline it, and keep the tension humming on each and every page. Having someone totally objective to say, “Your word count is HOW much?!?” or take me to task for overwriting was incredibly helpful.

Afraid to show a fellow writer your manuscript? Terrified of talking with an agent? Do you cringe at the thought of sending out a query letter? Here’s my advice:

Do it. Take the plunge and steel yourself for what comes next, no matter how much you want to puke at the thought. You’ll get some truly amazing feedback that will help you grow as a writer and editor, moving you one step closer to publication. You’ll learn that agents are simply people looking for a well-written, engaging story, not horrible, soul-crushing demons who laugh maniacally and gleefully at your work. You’ll find friends and colleagues who want nothing more than to have supportive companionship and constructive input for their writing, too.

You’ve got this. And eventually, when you’re “pitch perfect,” you’ll realize it was all worth it, every breathless leap off the cliff of your fear, when you begin to fly.